Patient-Centered Care as a Means to Reduce Health Care Cost

A much-talked about way to reduce our health care costs is a new emphasis on paying physicians for outcomes. This notion quickly segues into the implication that physicians do not communicate with their patients about treatment options, and if physicians talked to their patients, the patients would give the physicians better grades in patient satisfaction….

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Computers and Language Translation

Long before the health care industry became so enamored of electronic medical records, researchers were struggling with the problems of how to enable a computer to translate languages.  Over the years, computer translations have become much better than they were, and now anyone can generate a web page in a different language quite easily. The…

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There is a nursing shortage (Myth #3)

  Note:  Even back in 1992 when we wrote Modern Medicine, the focus of patient care had become the patient’s chart, not the patient.  Because there were no longer enough ward clerks to do the paperwork on a hospital floor, the nurses had to do it—at the expense of attending to patients. Can’t say whether…

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Technology Drives up Cost of Medical Care (Myth #2)

In Modern Medicine: What You’re Dying to Know, we talked about the high cost of technology because this was about the time hospitals were jumping on the MRI bandwagon. Some readers may remember the brouhaha over the cost of MRI machines when they first became available to hospitals. In our book we addressed seven notions…

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